KENNETH DEZHNEV - DEZHNEV & CO., INC. - Graphic Communications Consulting



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CAPABILITIES
GRAPHICS CONSULTING
 

Style & Standards   |   Templates   |   Display   |   Text & Informational   |   Special Projects
 

 

DISPLAY TYPOGRAPHY & GRAPHICS: LOGOS, ICONS, HEADLINES, ETC.

LOGOS, BRAND MARKS, ICONS, PICTOGRAMS,
HEADLINES, AND DISPLAY TYPOGRAPHY:
DESIGN, ADAPTATION, EXECUTION AND RE-CREATION.

I can create headlines that look good and convey the message, headlines that are as refined or as punchy as you want them to be.

And I can create icons and pictograms for informational graphics or branding that clearly convey the needed information or impressions.

For all the graphics I produce, I create high-quality, technically impeccable digital files, with multiple versions and sizes for different media as needed. I also provide thorough technical and aesthetic guidelines for their use—see Style & Standards.

I can also modify existing art, adapt it to new media, or refine it to work well in a wider range of applications—or just to look better.


Why logos look like logos

Logos and brand marks are a special kind of project, much more complicated than headlines, pictograms, and other display graphics. For a logo, looking good, standing out, and conveying the message isn’t enough. Logos aren’t one-shot items. They go everywhere your business presents itself, and they have to work flawlessly everywhere they might be used—in every medium (black-and-white newsprint, fine color printed pieces, imprinted office supplies, web, television), at every size (from lapel pin to billboard), in every graphic environment (serene and alone on your corporate headquarters, crowded among other logos in a vendor ad or directory page, briefly glimpsed on a roadside sign—or a racing car). And they have to work with the rest of your visual identity—colors, type, and general look. That means that a lot of very various technical and aesthetic factors have to be taken into account.

That’s why creative-driven approaches don’t work here—creative is just a small part of the job. That’s also why do-it-yourself jobs look like do-it-yourself jobs—and can be expensive to “fix up a bit”, and even more expensive to use, when it comes to real-world production.

These technical and aesthetic constraints explain why successful logos
look like—logos.

But that doesn’t mean that you have to accept a safe and simple generic-looking logo. With my knowledge of brand and corporate identity graphics, and technical knowledge of graphic communications, I can take the technical factors into account right from the beginning, research your market and your competitors’ graphic presentations, talk to you about your business, and develop a distinctive, memorable logo that says something about your firm.


Logo rendering & re-creation

I can also create art for existing logos. It often happens that digital art for an existing logo isn’t readily available in a useful format. Logos downloaded from websites don’t work for print—and may not work on the web if they’re changed in any way. Simply scanning a logo from a printed piece usually isn’t the answer either, except for the simplest one-color logos. And even in those cases, with the bitmap art produced by scans, you’re apt to run into trouble when you need to modify the logo, or to increase its size much.

For more complex logos and graphics, or for any logo that will be re-purposed using different sizes, colors, and other modifications, the only way to get acceptable quality is to re-create the artwork in vector, rather than bitmap, format. (This is true even if the logo is only going to be used on the Web—because bitmapped Web art can’t be re-sized. You have to go back to the vector art and re-size that.) Unlike bitmaps, vector art is resolution-independent: there are no dots or “jaggies,” no matter how big you blow it up. And, unlike bitmaps, each element of a well-constructed piece of vector art can be always be easily selected and modified.

But creating vector art that will do the job demands some skills that are rather scarce—even among designers and artists. It requires identifying exactly any typefaces used (or redrawing the letters), sizing and spacing them to match exactly, modifying the letterforms as needed, redrawing any other shapes and artwork. I’ve re-created hundreds of logos in vector format for high-visibility mergers and acquisitions advertising.



See the Graphics Consulting section of my portfolio for samples of my work in display typography & graphics.

 




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